Archive for December, 2008

The Ticking Of The Clock


The Ticking Of The Clock
by nakipie223

I always have a yearning when I have spoken to you;
One minute I can hear your voice, the next minute, we are through.

It seems to me that’s how it goes, the silence makes me blue;
I guess the silence lets me know I can’t get enough of you.

I reach my hand through the phone, you’re always out of reach;
You must come closer to the phone, is now my silent speech.

The time slows down, it seems to crawl, slowly the clock hands slide;
I know that you are gone from me, another day, I must abide.

I sit quietly till it’s time for me to shut my eyes;
Perchance to meet you in my dreams, and kiss my green eyed guy.

December 5, 2008 at 12:04 PM Leave a comment

Fighting to reduce weight.


If you are fighting to reduce weight, i have a word for you. Weight loss is not about eating less, when your body needs more are even running around for a month.

These days, there are even tablets that people take to cut weight! My dear freinds do you know the science behind that tablet?

What doest it contain that can burn your fat down in 1 week?

Am sorry if i sound like i have little faith in them, but come’on do you really have to go through all that to feel good about your self!

If you are to exercise, please go on , but don’t run around and expect a miracle to show up in one week. How to you expect the fat you have accumulated in 10 years to reduce in one week?

Be patient about your exercises, and please avoid tablets for weight loss if you can. Try as much as you can to use the food you ate. If you eat and sleep all day from Monday to Monday… what do you expect your body to do other than converting that food into fat.

Above all never stop exercises, It helps your body and mind!

Good luck pipo,

Ben.

December 4, 2008 at 7:19 AM Leave a comment

Men’s ware.


Be a smart man

Be a smart man

Am told if you want to know a man’s character, look at this dressing!

I know, it sound strange, cos many don’t mind about it… and that shows you are careless!

Those are not my words.

December 2, 2008 at 12:30 PM Leave a comment

ROSE:



Early in the morning
She stood up,
with her face covered with dew,

She looked troubled,
yet beautiful.
With a bleeding hand i reached out to her

Cold she was,i welcomed her into my house..
And there she lived forever.

Rose, you’re such a beautiful flower
Which ever color you are.

You will always have a place in my heart.

By me’ 4 ROSE:

December 2, 2008 at 12:16 PM Leave a comment

10 dirty little secrets you should know about working in IT


If you are preparing for a career in IT or are new to IT, many of the “dirty little secrets” listed below may surprise you because we don’t usually talk about them out loud. If you are an IT veteran, you’ve probably encountered most of these issues and have a few of your own to add — and please, by all means, take a moment to add them to the discussion. Most of these secrets are aimed at network administrators, IT managers, and desktop support professionals. This list is not aimed at developers and programmers — they have their own set of additional dirty little secrets — but some of these will apply to them as well.

10.) The pay in IT is good compared to many other professions, but since they pay you well, they often think they own you

Although the pay for IT professionals is not as great as it was before the dot-com flameout and the IT backlash in 2001-2002, IT workers still make very good money compared to many other professions (at least the ones that require only an associate’s or bachelor’s degree). And there is every reason to believe that IT pros will continue to be in demand in the coming decades, as technology continues to play a growing role in business and society. However, because IT professionals can be so expensive, some companies treat IT pros like they own them. If you have to answer a tech call at 9:00 PM because someone is working late, you hear, “That’s just part of the job.” If you need to work six hours on a Saturday to deploy a software update to avoid downtime during business hours, you get, “There’s no comp time for that since you’re on salary. That’s why we pay you the big bucks!”

9.) It will be your fault when users make silly errors

Some users will angrily snap at you when they are frustrated. They will yell, “What’s wrong with this thing?” or “This computer is NOT working!” or (my personal favorite), “What did you do to the computers?” In fact, the problem is that they accidentally deleted the Internet Explorer icon from the desktop, or unplugged the mouse from the back of the computer with their foot, or spilled their coffee on the keyboard.

8.) You will go from goat to hero and back again multiple times within any given day

When you miraculously fix something that had been keeping multiple employees from being able to work for the past 10 minutes — and they don’t realize how simple the fix really was — you will become the hero of the moment and everyone’s favorite employee. But they will conveniently forget about your hero anointment a few hours later when they have trouble printing because of a network slowdown — you will be enemy No. 1 at that moment. But if you show users a handy little Microsoft Outlook trick before the end of the day, you’ll soon return to hero status.

7.) Certifications won’t always help you become a better technologist, but they can help you land a better job or a pay raise

Headhunters and human resources departments love IT certifications. They make it easy to match up job candidates with job openings. They also make it easy for HR to screen candidates. You’ll hear a lot of veteran IT pros whine about techies who were hired based on certifications but who don’t have the experience to effectively do the job. They are often right. That has happened in plenty of places. But the fact is that certifications open up your career options. They show that you are organized and ambitious and have a desire to educate yourself and expand your skills. If you are an experienced IT pro and have certifications to match your experience, you will find yourself to be extremely marketable. Tech certifications are simply a way to prove your baseline knowledge and to market yourself as a professional. However, most of them are not a good indicator of how good you will be at the job.

6.) Your nontechnical co-workers will use you as personal tech support for their home PCs

Your co-workers (in addition to your friends, family, and neighbors) will view you as their personal tech support department for their home PCs and home networks. They will e-mail you, call you, and/or stop by your office to talk about how to deal with the virus that took over their home PC or the wireless router that stopped working after the last power outage and to ask you how to put their photos and videos on the Web so their grandparents in Iowa can view them. Some of them might even ask you if they can bring their home PC to the office for you to fix it. The polite ones will offer to pay you, but some of them will just hope or expect you can help them for free. Helping these folks can be very rewarding, but you have to be careful about where to draw the line and know when to decline. For help, take a look at TechRepublic’s free download “Ten ways to decline a request for free tech support.”

5.) Vendors and consultants will take all the credit when things work well and will blame you when things go wrong

Working with IT consultants is an important part of the job and can be one of the more challenging things to manage. Consultants bring niche expertise to help you deploy specialized systems, and when everything works right, it’s a great partnership. But you have to be careful. When things go wrong, some consultants will try to push the blame off on you by arguing that their solution works great everywhere else so it must be a problem with the local IT infrastructure. Conversely, when a project is wildly successful, there are consultants who will try to take all of the credit and ignore the substantial work you did to customize and implement the solution for your company.

4.) You’ll spend far more time babysitting old technologies than implementing new ones

One of the most attractive things about working in IT is the idea that we’ll get to play with the latest cutting edge technologies. However, that’s not usually the case in most IT jobs. The truth is that IT professionals typically spend far more time maintaining, babysitting, and nursing established technologies than implementing new ones. Even IT consultants, who work with more of the latest and greatest technologies, still tend to work primarily with established, proven solutions rather than the real cutting edge stuff.

3.) Veteran IT professionals are often the biggest roadblock to implementing new technologies

A lot of companies could implement more cutting edge stuff than they do. There are plenty of times when upgrading or replacing software or infrastructure can potentially save money and/or increase productivity and profitability. However, it’s often the case that one of the largest roadblocks to migrating to new technologies is not budget constraints or management objections; it’s the veteran techies in the IT department. Once they have something up and running, they are reluctant to change it. This can be a good thing because their jobs depend on keeping the infrastructure stable, but they also use that as an excuse to not spend the time to learn new things or stretch themselves in new directions. They get lazy, complacent, and self-satisfied.

2.) Some IT professionals deploy technologies that do more to consolidate their own power than to help the business

Another subtle but blameworthy thing that some IT professionals do is select and implement technologies based on how well those technologies make the business dependent on the IT pros to run them, rather than which ones are truly best for the business itself. For example, IT pros might select a solution that requires specialized skills to maintain instead of a more turnkey solution. Or an IT manager might have more of a Linux/UNIX background and so chooses a Linux-based solution over a Windows solution, even though the Windows solution is a better business decision (or, vice versa, a Windows admin might bypass a Linux-based appliance, for example). There are often excuses and justifications given for this type of behavior, but most of them are disingenuous.

1.) IT pros frequently use jargon to confuse nontechnical business managers and hide the fact that they screwed up

All IT pros — even the very best — screw things up once in a while. This is a profession where a lot is at stake and the systems that are being managed are complex and often difficult to integrate. However, not all IT pros are good at admitting when they make a mistake. Many of them take advantage of the fact that business managers (and even some high-level technical managers) don’t have a good understanding of technology, and so the techies will use jargon to confuse them (and cover up the truth) when explaining why a problem or an outage occurred. For example, to tell a business manager why a financial application went down for three hours, the techie might say, “We had a blue screen of death on the SQL Server that runs that app. Damn Microsoft!” What the techie would fail to mention was that the BSOD was caused by a driver update he applied to the server without first testing it on a staging machine.

From: http://blogs.techrepublic.com

Am sure you have done or experienced some.

Akoola

December 2, 2008 at 10:22 AM Leave a comment

Selfishness


The only thing necessary to change heaven into hell — if God were to allow it — is selfishness.

Selfishness is mankind’s fundamental defect. Selfish means:self-centered, self-serving, self-important.

At the root of every problem is selfishness.

JAMES 3:16 TEV
16 Where there is jealousy and selfishness, there is also disorder and every kind of evil.

Every selfish person is potentially your enemy.

All sin is selfish. No one ever sins for someone else — we do it for selfish reasons.

Divine love is the opposite of selfishness. Giving is the opposite of acting selfishly.

We are products of a corrupt culture that teaches selfishness, so it’s not unusual for us to think it’s not so bad.

But you must die to selfishness — or self-destruct. However, you’re unable to change by yourself. You can’t change the fruit without changing the root. That’s why you must be born again! Only by receiving Jesus Christ and letting Him change you inwardly can you become a truly unselfish person.

No other “religion” teaches to put others first, to love your enemies. Only Christianity teaches you can be totally changed and become a person with a new nature. There is no cure apart from Jesus!

SAY THIS: Jesus, please cure me of being selfish.

From:adevotion.org

December 2, 2008 at 9:05 AM Leave a comment

10 Things You Should Never Write in an E-Mail or Instant Message


The following 10 phrases draw more attention to your surreptitious e-mail activity than they do to conceal it, and though they seem harmless, they could put your job and career in jeopardy.

We’ve all done it: Dashed off an e-mail or instant message in which we shared with a co-worker confidential information about a layoff or bad quarter, trash-talked a boss or squawked about a hair-harebrained management decision.

Knowing we were typing something that we should have kept to ourselves, some of us might qualify our e-mail or IM with one of the following 10 statements, to underscore the sensitivity of the message and to cover our butts:

  1. “I could get into trouble for telling you this, but…”
  2. “Delete this e-mail immediately.”
  3. “I really shouldn’t put this in writing.”
  4. “Don’t tell So-and-So.” Or, “Don’t send this to So-and-So.”
  5. “She/He/They will never find out.”
  6. “We’re going to do this differently than normal.”
  7. “I don’t think I am supposed to know this, but…”
  8. “I don’t want to discuss this in e-mail. Please give me a call.”
  9. “Don’t ask. You don’t want to know.”
  10. “Is this actually legal?

I got this from http://advice.cio.com/meridith_levinson/10_things_you_should_never_write_in_an_e_mail_or_instant_message

Posted by: Meridith Levinson in Best Practices
Topic: Personal Management
Blog: Career Connection

December 2, 2008 at 7:41 AM Leave a comment

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You’re Welcome

On this blog you will find poems, songs, stories and articles about the bible teachings, family and marriage, nature, jokes, soaps, work, our low moments (like confessions, disappointments, depression, stress) and of cause those thing that keep us going(like inspirations, dreams, friends, relationships, love).

I appreciate every single visit you make, and I believe that you and I can make this site livelier.

Thank you.
& come again.

Benie
Akoola.
beneth@musiime.com

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About Me*


My name is Beneth Musiime Akoola, simple and very Imaginative.

I don't like crowds. However when it gets to online, i just want to talk to every one.

Am shy with new faces but those who get to know me, they will tell you am very talkative.

This blog is just another part of me, that likes 'telling' others whatever is on my mind.

Well that is me.
I look forward to know you!

Calender

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